Presenteeism

A A A

DEFINITION

A loss of workplace productivity resulting from employee health problems and/or personal issues. Even though the employee is physically present at work, because they are experiencing problems such as arthritis, allergies, family illness or stress, they are unable to fully perform their work duties and are more likely to make mistakes in the work they do perform.



INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

Like absenteeism, presenteeism costs employers money. Presenteeism can even be more costly than absenteeism because the unproductive employee may detract from coworkers' performance as well. In the case of a physically sick employee who shows up to work, the cost of that employee's illness is likely to spread to other workers. Companies must account for the loss of productivity from presenteeism in addition to lost time from sick days, vacation days and other forms of employee absence.




RELATED TERMS
  1. Absenteeism

    The habitual non-presence of an employee at his or her job. Possible causes ...
  2. Family And Medical Leave Act - ...

    The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) was signed into law on August 5, 1993 ...
  3. Workers' Compensation

    A state-sponsored system that pays monetary benefits to workers who become injured ...
  4. Accident And Health Benefits

    Fringe benefits provided to employees for sickness, accidental injury, or accidental ...
  5. Social Security

    A United States federal program of social insurance and benefits developed in ...
  6. Elimination Period

    The length of time between when an injury or illness begins and receiving benefit ...
  7. Disability-Income (DI) Insurance

    An insurance product that provides supplementary income in the event of an illness ...
  8. Catastrophic Illness Insurance

    A type of insurance that protects the insured, in the event of specified major ...
  9. Leave-Sharing Plan

    A plan that allows employees to donate unused sick-leave time to a charitable ...
  10. Ltd. (Limited)

    An abbreviation of "limited," Ltd. is a suffix that follows the name ...
Related Articles
  1. Selecting The Right Mix Of Insurance ...
    Home & Auto

    Selecting The Right Mix Of Insurance ...

  2. Human Capital: The Most Overlooked Asset ...
    Investing Basics

    Human Capital: The Most Overlooked Asset ...

  3. 5 Insurance Policies Everyone Should ...
    Home & Auto

    5 Insurance Policies Everyone Should ...

  4. Choosing The Best Disability Insurance ...
    Options & Futures

    Choosing The Best Disability Insurance ...

  5. Long-Term Care Insurance: Who Needs ...
    Home & Auto

    Long-Term Care Insurance: Who Needs ...

  6. The Disability Insurance Policy: Now ...
    Options & Futures

    The Disability Insurance Policy: Now ...

  7. Long-Term Care Insurance: You Have Options
    Options & Futures

    Long-Term Care Insurance: You Have Options

  8. The Path To Becoming A CEO
    Professionals

    The Path To Becoming A CEO

  9. The Power Of Branding
    Entrepreneurship

    The Power Of Branding

  10. Top Job Search Mistakes For Finance ...
    Professionals

    Top Job Search Mistakes For Finance ...

comments powered by Disqus
Hot Definitions
  1. Cash and Carry Transaction

    A type of transaction in the futures market in which the cash or spot price of a commodity is below the futures contract price. Cash and carry transactions are considered arbitrage transactions.
  2. Amplitude

    The difference in price from the midpoint of a trough to the midpoint of a peak of a security. Amplitude is positive when calculating a bullish retracement (when calculating from trough to peak) and negative when calculating a bearish retracement (when calculating from peak to trough).
  3. Ascending Triangle

    A bullish chart pattern used in technical analysis that is easily recognizable by the distinct shape created by two trendlines. In an ascending triangle, one trendline is drawn horizontally at a level that has historically prevented the price from heading higher, while the second trendline connects a series of increasing troughs.
  4. National Best Bid and Offer - NBBO

    A term applying to the SEC requirement that brokers must guarantee customers the best available ask price when they buy securities and the best available bid price when they sell securities.
  5. Maintenance Margin

    The minimum amount of equity that must be maintained in a margin account. In the context of the NYSE and FINRA, after an investor has bought securities on margin, the minimum required level of margin is 25% of the total market value of the securities in the margin account.
  6. Leased Bank Guarantee

    A bank guarantee that is leased to a third party for a specific fee. The issuing bank will conduct due diligence on the creditworthiness of the customer looking to secure a bank guarantee, then lease a guarantee to that customer for a set amount of money and over a set period of time, typically less than two years.
Trading Center