Price Band

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DEFINITION of 'Price Band'

A value-setting method in which a seller indicates an upper and lower cost range, between which buyers are able to place bids. The price band's floor and cap provides guidance to the buyers. This type of auction pricing technique is often used with initial public offerings (IPOs).

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Price Band'

Price bands can also be used in international trade. A country can set an upper and lower price that it will allow a good to be sold at in the market. If the price of an imported good is below the lower price threshold, the country could tax the good until it falls within the price band.

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