Price Inflation

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DEFINITION of 'Price Inflation'

An increase in the price of a standardized good/service or a basket of goods/services over a specific period of time (usually one year). Because the nominal amount of money available in an economy tends to grow larger every year relative to the supply of goods available for purchase, this overall demand pull tends to cause some degree of price inflation.

BREAKING DOWN 'Price Inflation'

Price inflation can also be seen in a slightly different form, where the price of a good is the same year over year, but the amount of the good received gradually decreases. For example, you may notice this in low-cost snack foods such as potato chips and chocolate bars, where the weight of the product gradually decreases, while the price remains the same.

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