Price Risk

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DEFINITION of 'Price Risk'

The risk of a decline in the value of a security or a portfolio. Price risk is the biggest risk faced by all investors. Although price risk specific to a stock can be minimized through diversification, market risk cannot be diversified away. Price risk, while unavoidable, can be mitigated through the use of hedging techniques.

BREAKING DOWN 'Price Risk'

Price risk also depends on the volatility of the securities held within a portfolio. For example, an investor who only holds a handful of junior mining companies in his or her portfolio may be exposed to a greater degree of price risk than an investor with a well-diversified portfolio of blue-chip stocks. Investors can use a number of tools and techniques to hedge price risk, ranging from relatively conservative decisions such as buying put options, to more aggressive strategies including short-selling and inverse ETFs.

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