Price to Free Cash Flow

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Price to Free Cash Flow'

A valuation metric that compares a company's market price to its level of annual free cash flow. This is similar to the valuation measure of price-to-cash flow but uses the stricter measure of free cash flow, which reduces operating cash flow by capital expenditures. This is done as companies need to maintain or expand their asset bases (capital expenditure) to either continue growing or maintain the current levels of free cash flow.

Price to Free Cash Flow

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Price to Free Cash Flow'

In general, the higher this measure, the more expensive the company is considered. But it is useful also to compare to the company's past levels of price-to-free-cash flow along with comparing the average within its industry. For example, if a company generated $200 million in operating cash flow and spent $50 million on capital expenditure, then it generated free cash flow of $150 million. If the company currently has a market cap of $5 billion, the company trades at 33 times free cash flow ($5 billion/$150 million).

VIDEO

RELATED TERMS
  1. Price-To-Cash-Flow Ratio

    The ratio of a stock’s price to its cash flow per share. The ...
  2. Operating Cash Flow - OCF

    In accounting, a measure of the amount of cash generated by a ...
  3. Capital Expenditure - CAPEX

    Funds used by a company to acquire or upgrade physical assets ...
  4. Free Cash Flow - FCF

    A measure of financial performance calculated as operating cash ...
  5. Earned Premium

    The amount of total premiums collected by an insurance company ...
  6. Insurance Regulatory Information ...

    A collection of databases and tools used to analyze the financial ...
Related Articles
  1. Retirement

    The Essentials Of Corporate Cash Flow

    Tune out the accounting noise and see whether a company is generating the stuff it needs to sustain itself.
  2. Markets

    Free Cash Flow: Free, But Not Always Easy

    Free cash flow is a great gauge of corporate health, but it's not immune to accounting trickery.
  3. Markets

    Introduction To Fundamental Analysis

    Learn this easy-to-understand technique of analyzing a company's financial statements and reports.
  4. Fundamental Analysis

    How do I use the PEG (price to earnings growth) ratio to determine whether a stock is overvalued?

    Using the PEG, or price/earnings to growth, ratio provides a better picture of a stock's valuation versus simply relying on the P/E ratio.
  5. Fundamental Analysis

    Paid-Up Capital

    Paid-Up Capital is listed in the equity section of the balance sheet. It represents the amount of money shareholders have paid into the company by purchasing shares. It’s essentially two accounts, ...
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    What is arbitrage pricing theory?

    Find out what arbitrage pricing theory is and how it can theoretically be used by investors to generate risk-free profit opportunities.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    How do intangible assets appear on a balance sheet?

    Understand how various types of intangible assets are handled in a company's accounting and which of them you can find on a company's balance sheet.
  8. Investing Basics

    Are marginal costs fixed or variable costs?

    Understand how to identify marginal costs as a function of fixed and variable costs. This article addresses how marginal costs vary based on production changes.
  9. Fundamental Analysis

    What is the difference between operating cash flow and net income?

    Learn how net income is an income statement for a certain period of time, while cash flow shows inflows and outflows based on conversion of sales into cash.
  10. Fundamental Analysis

    How do I calculate dividend payout ratio from a balance sheet?

    Understand what the dividend payout ratio indicates and learn how it can be calculated using the figures from a company's balance sheet statement.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Command Economy

    A system where the government, rather than the free market, determines what goods should be produced, how much should be ...
  2. Prospectus

    A formal legal document, which is required by and filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, that provides details ...
  3. Treasury Bond - T-Bond

    A marketable, fixed-interest U.S. government debt security with a maturity of more than 10 years. Treasury bonds make interest ...
  4. Weight Of Ice, Snow Or Sleet Insurance

    Financial protection against damage caused to property by winter weather specifically, damage caused if a roof caves in because ...
  5. Weather Insurance

    A type of protection against a financial loss that may be incurred because of rain, snow, storms, wind, fog, undesirable ...
  6. Portfolio Turnover

    A measure of how frequently assets within a fund are bought and sold by the managers. Portfolio turnover is calculated by ...
Trading Center