Price to Free Cash Flow

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Price to Free Cash Flow'

A valuation metric that compares a company's market price to its level of annual free cash flow. This is similar to the valuation measure of price-to-cash flow but uses the stricter measure of free cash flow, which reduces operating cash flow by capital expenditures. This is done as companies need to maintain or expand their asset bases (capital expenditure) to either continue growing or maintain the current levels of free cash flow.

Price to Free Cash Flow

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Price to Free Cash Flow'

In general, the higher this measure, the more expensive the company is considered. But it is useful also to compare to the company's past levels of price-to-free-cash flow along with comparing the average within its industry. For example, if a company generated $200 million in operating cash flow and spent $50 million on capital expenditure, then it generated free cash flow of $150 million. If the company currently has a market cap of $5 billion, the company trades at 33 times free cash flow ($5 billion/$150 million).

VIDEO

Loading the player...
RELATED TERMS
  1. Capital Expenditure (CAPEX)

    Funds used by a company to acquire or upgrade physical assets ...
  2. Price-To-Cash-Flow Ratio

    The ratio of a stock’s price to its cash flow per share. The ...
  3. Operating Cash Flow - OCF

    In accounting, a measure of the amount of cash generated by a ...
  4. Free Cash Flow - FCF

    A measure of financial performance calculated as operating cash ...
  5. Precedent Transaction Analysis

    A valuation method in which the prices paid for similar companies ...
  6. Chart Of Accounts

    A listing of each account a company owns, along with the account ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What are some examples of general and administrative expenses?

    In accounting, general and administrative expenses represent the necessary costs to maintain a company's daily operations ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. When does the fixed charge coverage ratio suggest that a company should stop borrowing ...

    Since the fixed charge coverage ratio indicates the number of times a company is capable of making its fixed charge payments ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How can a company execute a tax-free spin-off?

    The two commonly used methods for doing a tax-free spinoff are either to distribute shares of the spinoff company to existing ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How are American Depository Receipts (ADRs) priced?

    The price of an American depositary receipt (ADR) is determined by the bank or other financial institution that issues it. ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How can EV/EBITDA be used in conjunction with the P/E ratio?

    Because they provide different perspectives of analysis, the EV/EBITDA multiple and the P/E ratio can be used together to ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How often should a small business owner go through a bank reconciliation process?

    Small business owners should go through the bank reconciliation process at least monthly, and many business consultants recommend ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Retirement

    The Essentials Of Corporate Cash Flow

    Tune out the accounting noise and see whether a company is generating the stuff it needs to sustain itself.
  2. Markets

    Free Cash Flow: Free, But Not Always Easy

    Free cash flow is a great gauge of corporate health, but it's not immune to accounting trickery.
  3. Markets

    Introduction To Fundamental Analysis

    Learn this easy-to-understand technique of analyzing a company's financial statements and reports.
  4. Economics

    Understanding the Top Line

    Top line refers to a company’s gross sales without any reductions for discounts or returns.
  5. Fundamental Analysis

    Explaining Price Targets

    A price target is what an investment analyst projects a security’s future price to be.
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    Understanding Activity Ratios

    Activity ratios measure how effectively a business uses its assets.
  7. Professionals

    DCF Vs. Comparables: Which One To Use

    DCF and Comparables models are widely used in equity valuation. We explain the pros and cons of each method.
  8. Investing

    Is There Still Opportunity in Japanese Stocks?

    Japanese stocks’ strong performance has prompted market watchers to question whether there’s still a case for adding exposure to the Land of the Rising Sun
  9. Fundamental Analysis

    Understanding Consolidated Financial Statements

    Consolidated financial statements are the combined financial statements of a parent company and its subsidiaries.
  10. Fundamental Analysis

    Explaining the Common Size Income Statement

    A common size income statement expresses each account as a percentage of net sales.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Bogey

    A buzzword that refers to a benchmark used to evaluate a fund's performance. The benchmark is an index that reflects the ...
  2. Xetra

    An all-electronic trading system based in Frankfurt, Germany. Launched in 1997 and operated by the Deutsche Börse, the Xetra ...
  3. Nuncupative Will

    A verbal will that must have two witnesses and can only deal with the distribution of personal property. A nuncupative will ...
  4. OsMA

    An abbreviation for Oscillator - Moving Average. OsMA is used in technical analysis to represent the variance between an ...
  5. Investopedia

    One of the best-known sources of financial information on the internet. Investopedia is a resource for investors, consumers ...
  6. Unfair Claims Practice

    The improper avoidance of a claim by an insurer or an attempt to reduce the size of the claim. By engaging in unfair claims ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!