Preferred Redeemable Increased Dividend Equity Security - PRIDES

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Preferred Redeemable Increased Dividend Equity Security - PRIDES'

First introduced by Merrill Lynch, PRIDES are synthetic securities consisting of a forward contract to purchase the issuer's underlying security and an interest bearing deposit. Interest payments are made at regular intervals, and conversion into the underlying security is mandatory at maturity.

BREAKING DOWN 'Preferred Redeemable Increased Dividend Equity Security - PRIDES'

Similar to convertible securities, PRIDES allow investors to earn stable cash flows while still participating in the capital gains of an underlying stock.This is possible because these products are valued along the same lines as the underlying security.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Preferred Stock

    A class of ownership in a corporation that has a higher claim ...
  2. Forward Contract

    A customized contract between two parties to buy or sell an asset ...
  3. Convertible Preferred Stock

    Preferred stock that includes an option for the holder to convert ...
  4. Synthetic

    A financial instrument that is created artificially by simulating ...
  5. Record Date

    The cut-off date established by a company in order to determine ...
  6. Derivative

    A security with a price that is dependent upon or derived from ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    How To Create A Modern Fixed-Income Portfolio

    Exposure to different asset classes is required to generate income, reduce risk and beat inflation. Find out how bonds can help.
  2. Bonds & Fixed Income

    The Impact Of An Inverted Yield Curve

    Find out what happens when short-term interest rates exceed long-term rates.
  3. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    The Bond Market: A Look Back

    Find out how fixed-income investments evolved in the past century and what it means today.
  4. Options & Futures

    Introduction To Inflation-Protected Securities

    Inflation is an enemy to investors - except to those who invest in IPS, which guarantee a real rate of return with no credit risk.
  5. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Asset Allocation In A Bond Portfolio

    An investor's fixed-income portfolio can easily beat the average bond fund. Learn how and why!
  6. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Calculating Yield to Worst

    Yield to worst is the lowest possible yield on a bond that may be called in the future.
  7. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: WisdomTree International LargeCp Div

    Learn more about the WisdomTree International LargeCap Dividend fund, an income-based international equities ETF that focuses heavily on the United Kingdom.
  8. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: First Trust Dow Jones Global Sel Div

    Find out about the First Trust Dow Jones Global Select Dividend Index Fund, and learn detailed information about characteristics and suitability of the fund.
  9. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: iShares Floating Rate Bond

    Explore detailed analysis and information of the iShares Floating Rate Bond ETF, and learn how to use this ETF as a defense against rising interest rates.
  10. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: Vanguard Intermediate-Term Corp Bd

    Learn about the Vanguard Intermediate-Term Corporate Bond ETF, and explore detailed analysis of the fund's characteristics, risks and historical statistics.
RELATED FAQS
  1. Are dividends considered passive or ordinary income?

    Despite the fact that earning dividends requires no active participation on the part of the shareholder, they do not meet ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Is dividend income taxable?

    Dividend income is taxable but it is taxed in different ways depending on whether the dividends are qualified or nonqualified. ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How do dividends affect net asset value (NAV) in mutual funds?

    Distribution of dividends reduces the net asset value (NAV) of mutual fund shares. However, this doesn't mean that fund investors ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How do dividends affect the balance sheet?

    Dividends paid in cash affect a company's balance sheet by decreasing the company's cash account on the asset side and decreasing ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Who actually declares a dividend?

    It is a company's board of directors who actually declares a dividend. The declaration date is the first of four important ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Where exactly do dividends come from?

    Companies pay dividends in cash, which typically come from the companies' cash flows from operations by selling goods and ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Depreciation

    1. A method of allocating the cost of a tangible asset over its useful life. Businesses depreciate long-term assets for both ...
  2. Recession

    A significant decline in activity across the economy, lasting longer than a few months. It is visible in industrial production, ...
  3. Bubble Theory

    A school of thought that believes that the prices of assets can temporarily rise far above their true values and that these ...
  4. Stock Market Crash

    A rapid and often unanticipated drop in stock prices. A stock market crash can be the result of major catastrophic events, ...
  5. Financial Crisis

    A situation in which the value of financial institutions or assets drops rapidly. A financial crisis is often associated ...
  6. Election Period

    The period of time during which an investor who owns an extendable or retractable bond must indicate to the issuer whether ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!