Primary Dealer Credit Facility - PDCF

DEFINITION of 'Primary Dealer Credit Facility - PDCF'

An institution created by the Federal Reserve to provide overnight loans to primary dealers through their clearing banks in exchange for eligible collateral. The Primary Dealer Credit Facility (PDCF) provides loans that settle the same business day and mature the following business day. As of February 3, 2009, the PDCF will remain in operation until October 30, 2009.

BREAKING DOWN 'Primary Dealer Credit Facility - PDCF'

The Primary Dealer Credit Facility was established in order to encourage financial markets to function more effectively. Primary dealers borrow overnight loans from the PDCF through their clearing banks at the primary credit rate offered by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

A frequency-based fee is assigned to primary dealers who borrow from the PDCF on more than 45 business days.

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