Primary Regulator

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DEFINITION of 'Primary Regulator'

The state or federal regulatory agency that is the primary supervising entity of a financial institution. In most cases, this is the same agency that issued the initial charter allowing the financial institution to operate. Banks and other financial institutions must file quarterly call reports that indicate their income and overall condition to their primary regulatory authority.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Primary Regulator'

For national banks, the primary regulator is the Comptroller of the Currency. State-chartered banks and bank holding companies initially report to the Federal Reserve Board. State banks answer to the banking departments of their respective states.

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