Primary Regulator

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Primary Regulator'

The state or federal regulatory agency that is the primary supervising entity of a financial institution. In most cases, this is the same agency that issued the initial charter allowing the financial institution to operate. Banks and other financial institutions must file quarterly call reports that indicate their income and overall condition to their primary regulatory authority.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Primary Regulator'

For national banks, the primary regulator is the Comptroller of the Currency. State-chartered banks and bank holding companies initially report to the Federal Reserve Board. State banks answer to the banking departments of their respective states.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau ...

    A regulatory agency charged with overseeing financial products ...
  2. Call Report

    A report that must be filed by all regulated financial institutions ...
  3. Federal Reserve Regulations

    Rules put in place by the Federal Reserve Board to regulate the ...
  4. Lead Bank

    A bank that oversees the arrangement of a loan syndication. The ...
  5. Controller

    An individual who has responsibility for all accounting-related ...
  6. Federal Reserve Board - FRB

    The governing body of the Federal Reserve System. The seven members ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What measures could the U.S. Government take to prevent another crisis similar to ...

    Some of the measures that the U.S. government can take to prevent another crisis similar to the savings and loan (S&L) ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is each party's role in a reverse repurchase agreement?

    There are two principal parties in a reverse repurchase agreement. The first party, often called the seller, is offering ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are some of the major regulatory agencies responsible for overseeing financial ...

    There are a number of agencies assigned to regulate and oversee financial institutions and financial markets, including the ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What risks does the dealer (lender) in a reverse repurchase agreement take on?

    In a conventional repurchase agreement, or repo, the dealer is the borrower and takes on similar risks to borrowers in other ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What do banks do to control the bank reserve?

    While all banks are required to maintain a specific amount of bank reserves, the banks themselves do not control the minimum ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How does wage price spiral impact interest rates?

    A wage-price spiral occurs when wages and prices rise in tandem in a self-perpetuating cycle that exerts inflationary pressure ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Savings

    Are Your Bank Deposits Insured?

    Learn how the FDIC is helping to keep your money in your pockets.
  2. Retirement

    CDIC Protects Canadians From Bank Failure

    Bank failures can happen in Canada, but many deposits are insured. Find out what's covered.
  3. Options & Futures

    Who Backs Up The FDIC?

    The FDIC insures depositors against loss, but what happens if it runs out of money?
  4. Options & Futures

    Bank Failure: Will Your Assets Be Protected?

    The SIPC and FDIC insure against personal financial ruin when banks or brokerages go belly up.
  5. Markets

    Rising Interest Rates: Who it Helps, Who it Hurts

    When interest rates rise, the impact hits some of us differently. Here's why.
  6. Stock Analysis

    3 Stocks To Buy and Hold For the Rest of 2015

    One of the dominant themes to consider for 2015 is the normalization of monetary policy as the Fed raises interest rates.
  7. Economics

    Greece Isn’t The Only Problem U.S. Stocks Face

    Both stocks and bonds fell last week, due to several factors dampening investor sentiment. The most obvious one is the evolving situation in Greece.
  8. Entrepreneurship

    Fed Raising Rates Affects Startup Funding

    With interest rates having nowhere else to go but up, the Fed’s impending interest rate raise will likely begin to reverse the flow of startup funding.
  9. Economics

    Explaining the Reserve Ratio

    Reserve ratio is the amount of cash a bank must keep in its bank vaults or deposit into a central, governing bank.
  10. Investing

    What’s Driving Markets Today

    While U.S. stocks managed to eke out modest gains last week, it wasn’t without some violent swings along the way.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. National Currency

    The currency or legal tender issued by a nation's central bank or monetary authority. The national currency of a nation is ...
  2. Treasury Yield

    The return on investment, expressed as a percentage, on the debt obligations of the U.S. government. Treasuries are considered ...
  3. Bund

    A bond issued by Germany's federal government, or the German word for "bond." Bunds are the German equivalent of U.S. Treasury ...
  4. European Central Bank - ECB

    The central bank responsible for the monetary system of the European Union (EU) and the euro currency. The bank was formed ...
  5. Quantitative Easing

    An unconventional monetary policy in which a central bank purchases private sector financial assets in order to lower interest ...
  6. Current Account Deficit

    A measurement of a country’s trade in which the value of goods and services it imports exceeds the value of goods and services ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!