Primary Regulator

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Primary Regulator'

The state or federal regulatory agency that is the primary supervising entity of a financial institution. In most cases, this is the same agency that issued the initial charter allowing the financial institution to operate. Banks and other financial institutions must file quarterly call reports that indicate their income and overall condition to their primary regulatory authority.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Primary Regulator'

For national banks, the primary regulator is the Comptroller of the Currency. State-chartered banks and bank holding companies initially report to the Federal Reserve Board. State banks answer to the banking departments of their respective states.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau ...

    A regulatory agency charged with overseeing financial products ...
  2. Call Report

    A report that must be filed by all regulated financial institutions ...
  3. Federal Reserve Regulations

    Rules put in place by the Federal Reserve Board to regulate the ...
  4. Lead Bank

    A bank that oversees the arrangement of a loan syndication. The ...
  5. Controller

    An individual who has responsibility for all accounting-related ...
  6. Federal Reserve Board - FRB

    The governing body of the Federal Reserve System. The seven members ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What measures could the U.S. Government take to prevent another crisis similar to ...

    Some of the measures that the U.S. government can take to prevent another crisis similar to the savings and loan (S&L) ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Why do commercial banks borrow from the Federal Reserve?

    Commercial banks borrow from the Federal Reserve primarily to meet reserve requirements when their cash on hand is low before ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are the differences between the Federal Funds Rate and LIBOR?

    In macroeconomics, the interest rate plays a crucial role in delivering an equilibrium on the assets market by equating the ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the correlation between inflation and interest rate risk?

    There is a positive correlation between inflation and interest rate risk. Inflation basically occurs when there is too much ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Which nations' economies have reserve ratios?

    Most developed economies require a reserve ratio for their banks and other depository institutions, though there are some ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the primary use of reverse repurchase agreements?

    The Federal Reserve utilizes a reverse repurchase agreement as one of two instruments used for the primary purpose of offsetting ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Top 3 ETFs For Investing in China

    Discover the top three China ETFs. Chinese stocks tend to be quite volatile, presenting opportunities for savvy investors, given the country's high growth rate.
  2. Savings

    Are Your Bank Deposits Insured?

    Learn how the FDIC is helping to keep your money in your pockets.
  3. Retirement

    CDIC Protects Canadians From Bank Failure

    Bank failures can happen in Canada, but many deposits are insured. Find out what's covered.
  4. Options & Futures

    Who Backs Up The FDIC?

    The FDIC insures depositors against loss, but what happens if it runs out of money?
  5. Options & Futures

    Bank Failure: Will Your Assets Be Protected?

    The SIPC and FDIC insure against personal financial ruin when banks or brokerages go belly up.
  6. Economics

    As Fed Prepares To Move, Gold Is Losing Its Luster

    Last week’s Semi-Annual Monetary Policy Report to Congress returned investors’ focus back to the fundamentals, and a general upbeat of the economy.
  7. Personal Finance

    Are Markets Ready For An Interest Rate Hike?

    Despite financial market fears over the uncertainty of Greece’s debt crisis and the recent drop in China’s stock-market, Federal Reserve Chairwoman Janet Yellen has reaffirmed the Fed’s plans ...
  8. Home & Auto

    How the Fed Affects Reverse Mortgages

    An in depth look at how the Federal Reserve affects reverse mortgages.
  9. Investing

    Five Portfolio Moves For The Second Half

    After a relatively calm few months, market volatility is back. If you are an investor, we help you prepare your portfolio with these five portfolio moves.
  10. Economics

    Putting The Greece Deal In Context

    After a number of surprising twists, the recent Greek drama finally took an expected turn with news that Greece and its creditors struck a tentative deal.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Investopedia

    One of the best-known sources of financial information on the internet. Investopedia is a resource for investors, consumers ...
  2. Unfair Claims Practice

    The improper avoidance of a claim by an insurer or an attempt to reduce the size of the claim. By engaging in unfair claims ...
  3. Killer Bees

    An individual or firm that helps a company fend off a takeover attempt. A killer bee uses defensive strategies to keep an ...
  4. Sin Tax

    A state-sponsored tax that is added to products or services that are seen as vices, such as alcohol, tobacco and gambling. ...
  5. Grandfathered Activities

    Nonbank activities, some of which would normally not be permissible for bank holding companies and foreign banks in the United ...
  6. Touchline

    The highest price that a buyer of a particular security is willing to pay and the lowest price at which a seller is willing ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!