Primary Reserves

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DEFINITION of 'Primary Reserves'

The minimum amount of cash required to operate a bank. Primary reserves also include the legal reserves that are housed in a Federal Reserve or other correspondent bank. Checks that have not been collected are included in this amount as well.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Primary Reserves'

Primary reserves are kept in order to cover unexpected major withdrawals or runs of withdrawals. They serve as a defense against a substantial reduction in liquidity. These reserves must be kept more liquid than secondary reserves, which may be invested in marketable securities such as Treasury offerings.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Secondary Reserves

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  2. Lagged Reserves

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  3. Proved Reserves

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  4. Free Reserves

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  5. Correspondent

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  6. Excess Reserves

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