Prime Cost

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DEFINITION of 'Prime Cost'

A business's expenses for the materials and labor it uses in production. Prime cost is a way of measuring the total cost of the production inputs needed to create a given output. By analyzing its prime costs, a company can determine how much it must charge for its finished product in order to make a profit. By lowering its prime costs, a company can increase its profit margin and/or undercut its competitors' prices.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Prime Cost'

For example, the prime costs for creating a can of soda would include raw materials such as the aluminum needed for the cans, ink to customize the cans with the product's brand name and logo, soda ingredients (i.e. carbonated water, caramel coloring, caffeine, sugar or aspartame and preservatives), freight charges to transport the raw materials to the manufacturing plant and the wages, taxes and benefits paid to or on behalf of the employees involved in the soda manufacturing process.

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