Private Buyer


DEFINITION of 'Private Buyer'

An individual or organization that is purchasing an asset and whose actions are not backed by a government or government agency. The private buyer is responsible for all costs associated with the transaction, and parties to the transaction can only pursue the private buyer for recourse in the case that there are problems with the transaction.

BREAKING DOWN 'Private Buyer'

Transactions with a private buyer typically carry more risk than those involving a public buyer, which generally refers to a government-backed entity.

For example, a private buyer might be a company that is purchasing the mortgage of a property. Because the company is not backed by the government, it does not have the "full faith and credit" that a governmental organization would. If the company fails to make mortgage payments, the party that sold the mortgage will not have the recourse of seeking payment from the government.

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  4. Ginnie Mae - Government National ...

    A U.S. government corporation within the U.S. Department of Housing ...
  5. Treasury Bill - T-Bill

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  6. Encumbrance

    A claim against a property by a party that is not the owner. ...
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