Pro-Rata Tranche

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Pro-Rata Tranche'

A portion of a syndicated loan that is made up of a revolving credit facility and an amortizing term loan. The pro-rata tranche is syndicated by banks, as opposed to institutional tranches, which are primarily comprised of non-bank lending institutions. Both tranches may often be found within the same syndicated loan.

Pro-rata tranches are common within the leverage loan market, or in loans to companies with existing high debt loads.


INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Pro-Rata Tranche'

Within the pro-rata tranche, the revolving credit line will typically have the same ending or maturity date as the term loan. By forming a syndicate, banks involved in the deal can spread the credit risks among several lenders. Pro-rata tranches have historically been much larger than institutional tranches in terms of dollar size.


RELATED TERMS
  1. Pro-Rata

    Used to describe a proportionate allocation. A method of assigning ...
  2. Credit Facility

    A type of loan made in a business or corporate finance context. ...
  3. Term Loan

    A loan from a bank for a specific amount that has a specified ...
  4. Tranches

    A piece, portion or slice of a deal or structured financing. ...
  5. Syndicated Loan

    A loan offered by a group of lenders (called a syndicate) who ...
  6. Revolving Credit

    A line of credit where the customer pays a commitment fee and ...
Related Articles
  1. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    The Bond Market: A Look Back

    Find out how fixed-income investments evolved in the past century and what it means today.
  2. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Asset Allocation In A Bond Portfolio

    An investor's fixed-income portfolio can easily beat the average bond fund. Learn how and why!
  3. Investing

    Why do companies issue debt and bonds? Can't they just borrow from the bank?

    Companies issue bonds to finance operations. Most companies can borrow from banks, but view direct borrowing from a bank as more restrictive and expensive than selling debt on the open market ...
  4. Fundamental Analysis

    Are accounts receivable used when calculating a company's debt collateral?

    Learn how accounts receivables are recorded as assets on a balance sheet; they are used when calculating a company's total debt collateral.
  5. Professionals

    How do companies measure labor supply in human resources planning?

    Find out how and why a company's human resources department would measure labor supply, and what policies would address a shortage or surplus.
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    Why are OTC (over-the-counter) transactions controversial?

    Learn more about over-the-counter transactions, and why OTC traders are considered riskier than traders working with larger market exchanges.
  7. Options & Futures

    What is the difference between arbitrage and hedging?

    Dive into two very important financial concepts: arbitrage and hedging. See how each of these strategies can play a role for savvy investors.
  8. Fundamental Analysis

    What is the difference between cost of equity and cost of capital?

    Read about some of the differences between a company's cost of equity and its cost of capital, two measures of its required returns on raised capital.
  9. Fundamental Analysis

    What is arbitrage pricing theory?

    Find out what arbitrage pricing theory is and how it can theoretically be used by investors to generate risk-free profit opportunities.
  10. Fundamental Analysis

    What does a high weighted average cost of capital (WACC) signify?

    Find out what it means for a company to have a relatively high weighted average cost of capital, or WACC, and why this is important to lenders and investors.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Command Economy

    A system where the government, rather than the free market, determines what goods should be produced, how much should be ...
  2. Prospectus

    A formal legal document, which is required by and filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, that provides details ...
  3. Treasury Bond - T-Bond

    A marketable, fixed-interest U.S. government debt security with a maturity of more than 10 years. Treasury bonds make interest ...
  4. Weight Of Ice, Snow Or Sleet Insurance

    Financial protection against damage caused to property by winter weather specifically, damage caused if a roof caves in because ...
  5. Weather Insurance

    A type of protection against a financial loss that may be incurred because of rain, snow, storms, wind, fog, undesirable ...
  6. Portfolio Turnover

    A measure of how frequently assets within a fund are bought and sold by the managers. Portfolio turnover is calculated by ...
Trading Center