Problem Loan

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DEFINITION of 'Problem Loan'

In the banking industry, a problem loan is one of two things; it can be a commercial loan that is at least 90 days past due, or a consumer loan that it at least 180 days past due. This type of loan is also referred to as a nonperforming asset.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Problem Loan'

The subprime mortgage meltdown and 2007-2009 recession led to a rise in the number of problem loans that banks had on their books. Several federal programs were enacted to help consumers deal with their delinquent debt, most of which focused on mortgages. Problem loans can often result in property foreclosure, repossession or other adverse legal actions.

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