DEFINITION of 'Procurement'

1. To attain possession of something, usually after exerting a substantial effort to do so.

2. The purchasing of something usually for a company, government or other organization.

BREAKING DOWN 'Procurement'

Here are some examples of sentences using the word "procurement":

1. He was able to procure seats to the sold-out concert.

2. The company has a large budget for the procurement of office supplies.

Procurement is a term commonly used in the energy industry as many retailers must procure gas, electricity and/or other energy sources through trading activities, such as buying futures contracts.

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    Mutual funds invest in not only stocks and fixed-income securities but also options and futures. There exists a separate ... Read Full Answer >>
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  3. Why do companies enter into futures contracts?

    Different types of companies may enter into futures contracts for different purposes. The most common reason is to hedge ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What does a futures contract cost?

    The value of a futures contract is derived from the cash value of the underlying asset. While a futures contract may have ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are the main risks associated with trading derivatives?

    The primary risks associated with trading derivatives are market, counterparty, liquidity and interconnection risks. Derivatives ... Read Full Answer >>
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