Product Life Cycle Management

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DEFINITION of 'Product Life Cycle Management'

The observation of an item as it moves through the typical stages of development, growth, maturity and decline. Effective product life cycle management brings together the many companies, departments and employees involved with the product's production to streamline their activities, with the ultimate goal of producing a product that outperforms its competitors and is highly profitable.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Product Life Cycle Management'

Proper management of a product's life cycle has many benefits, such as getting the product to market faster, putting a higher quality product on the market, improving product safety, increasing sales opportunities and reducing errors and waste. Specialized computer software is available to assist with product life cycle management through functions such as document management, design integration and process management.



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