Product Placement

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DEFINITION of 'Product Placement'

A form of advertising (usually not involving ads) in which branded products and services are noticeable within a drama production with large audiences. Product placements are presented in way that will generate positive feelings towards the advertised brand and are implemented, mentioned, or discussed through the program. This enables the audience to develop a stronger connection with the brand and provides justification for their purchase decision.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Product Placement'

Also known as "embedded marketing," product placements are typically found in movies, television shows, plays, etc. An example of this would be the elite sports cars often featured in the popular James Bond films.

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