Product Placement

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Product Placement'

A form of advertising (usually not involving ads) in which branded products and services are noticeable within a drama production with large audiences. Product placements are presented in way that will generate positive feelings towards the advertised brand and are implemented, mentioned, or discussed through the program. This enables the audience to develop a stronger connection with the brand and provides justification for their purchase decision.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Product Placement'

Also known as "embedded marketing," product placements are typically found in movies, television shows, plays, etc. An example of this would be the elite sports cars often featured in the popular James Bond films.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Brand Awareness

    The likelihood that consumers recognize the existence and availability ...
  2. Product Differentiation

    A marketing process that showcases the differences between products. ...
  3. Banner Advertising

    A rectangular graphic display that stretches across the top or ...
  4. Brand Equity

    The value premium that a company realizes from a product with ...
  5. Brand

    A distinguishing symbol, mark, logo, name, word, sentence or ...
  6. Purchase Price

    The price that an investor pays for a security. This price is ...
Related Articles
  1. Don't Be Misled By Investment Advertising
    Home & Auto

    Don't Be Misled By Investment Advertising

  2. Advertising, Crocodiles And Moats
    Professionals

    Advertising, Crocodiles And Moats

  3. Financial Careers According To Hollywood
    Professionals

    Financial Careers According To Hollywood

  4. How To Target Ideal Customers
    Professionals

    How To Target Ideal Customers

Hot Definitions
  1. Debit Spread

    Two options with different market prices that an investor trades on the same underlying security. The higher priced option ...
  2. Leading Indicator

    A measurable economic factor that changes before the economy starts to follow a particular pattern or trend. Leading indicators ...
  3. Wage-Price Spiral

    A macroeconomic theory to explain the cause-and-effect relationship between rising wages and rising prices, or inflation. ...
  4. Accelerated Depreciation

    Any method of depreciation used for accounting or income tax purposes that allows greater deductions in the earlier years ...
  5. Call Risk

    The risk, faced by a holder of a callable bond, that a bond issuer will take advantage of the callable bond feature and redeem ...
  6. Parity Price

    When the price of an asset is directly linked to another price. Examples of parity price are: 1. Convertibles - the price ...
Trading Center