Production Rate

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DEFINITION of 'Production Rate'

In manufacturing, the number of goods that can be produced during a given period of time. Alternatively, the amount of time it takes to produce one unit of a good.


In construction, the rate at which workers are expected to complete a certain segment, such as a road or building. The production rate will depend on the speed at which workers are expected to operate, generally categorized as slow, average or fast.




BREAKING DOWN 'Production Rate'

For manufacturing and construction, a higher production rate can lead to a decrease in quality. As machines or employees work to have more product pushed through the production line or more of a building completed, more mistakes are likely to happen. There is thus a point at which a decrease in quality could wind up costing a company more, even if less time is needed to push out a unit.

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