Productize

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DEFINITION of 'Productize'

To take a new service, product or product feature - that a company has provided to a single customer or a few customers on a custom basis - and turn it into a standard, fully tested, packaged, supported and marketed product. For example, a person can productize their expertise by putting it into a tangible object by creating a product based on that knowledge.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Productize'

An idea, a process, a prototype or an area of expertise can be productized into marketable and salable products. For example, a marketer can write a "how-to" book for new entrepreneurs that would teach them how to market their business, or a web designer can create a DVD series on how to design web sites.

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