Profits Interest

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DEFINITION of 'Profits Interest'

A monetary right awarded to the general partner, investment manager or a service provider of a partnership. The award consists of receiving a percentage of profits from a partnership without having to contribute capital to the partnership. Profits interests are often criticized as recipients can generate large profits for themselves while not incurring sufficient risk.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Profits Interest'

This method serves as an incentive for partners to become more proactive in pursuing bigger and better profits thus contributing towards the companies' growth. This situation presents a tax benefit in that beneficiaries of this instrument can be taxed under long-term capital gains versus the higher federal tax rate.

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