Pro Forma

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DEFINITION of 'Pro Forma'

A Latin term meaning "for the sake of form". In the investing world, it describes a method of calculating financial results in order to emphasize either current or projected figures.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Pro Forma'

Pro forma financial statements could be designed to reflect a proposed change, such as a merger or acquisition, or to emphasize certain figures when a company issues an earnings announcement to the public.

Investors should be careful when reading a company's pro-forma financial statements, as the figures may not comply with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). In some cases, the pro-forma figures may differ greatly from the those derived from GAAP.

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