Project Notes

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DEFINITION of 'Project Notes'

A short-term debt obligation issued to finance a project or endeavor past a specified milestone, or to fund multiple small projects on a short-term basis. Project notes are often used by municipalities to fund urban renewal programs and are guaranteed by the U.S Department of Housing and Urban Development.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Project Notes'

Occasionally, organizations need funding for short-term projects that require one-time injections of cash to finance. Rather than issue long-term debt or seek alternative financing arrangements, short-term notes can be issued with the specific project written into the indenture so that the funds must be used for that purpose.

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