Proof Of Deposit - POD

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DEFINITION of 'Proof Of Deposit - POD'

The verification that the dollar amount of a check or draft being deposited is correct. Proof of deposit is accomplished when the amount written on the check is compared to the amount on the deposit slip. This is the second step in the process of check presentation for payment after checks have been sorted by a reader-sorter machine.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Proof Of Deposit - POD'

The proof of deposit is done after all of the checks have been separated by the sorting machine into either the "on us" category or "on them" category. This second step is the only procedure in the check processing process that is not completely automated. Check proofing is a manual process that is done after check sorting is complete and the routing and account numbers on the check have been recorded by the sorter.

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