Proportional Consolidation


DEFINITION of 'Proportional Consolidation'

In accounting for joint ventures, a method of including items of income, expense, assets and liabilities in proportion to the firm's percentage of participation in the venture. The proportional consolidation method was initially favored by IFRS accounting standards, though it also allows use of the equity method. Under U.S. GAAP, a firm's interest in a joint venture is accounted for using the equity method. Recently, IFRS standards have begun to converge with those of GAAP on this matter.

BREAKING DOWN 'Proportional Consolidation'

The issue of accounting for joint ventures has been a matter of ongoing discussion in the movement to resolve significant differences between IFRS and U.S. GAAP. Proponents of proportional consolidation argue that this method provides more detailed information, since it breaks out the performance of the joint venture interest into its component parts. The equity method is favored by others, who feel that it is a simpler and more straightforward approach of accounting for outside investments.

  1. Acquisition

    A corporate action in which a company buys most, if not all, ...
  2. Consolidation

    In technical analysis, the movement of an asset's price within ...
  3. Mergers And Acquisitions - M&A

    A general term used to refer to the consolidation of companies. ...
  4. Acquisition Premium

    The difference between the estimated real value of a company ...
  5. Conglomerate Merger

    A merger between firms that are involved in totally unrelated ...
  6. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles ...

    The common set of accounting principles, standards and procedures ...
Related Articles
  1. Bonds & Fixed Income

    8 Reasons M&A Deals Fall Through

    Mergers and acquisitions can mean big success. But what about all the deals that fall through?
  2. Fundamental Analysis

    Accretion / Dilution Analysis: A Merger Mystery

    This analysis tool is an effective way to value mergers and acquisitions. The deal's on the table, but should you sign the papers?
  3. Options & Futures

    Parents And Spinoffs: When To Buy And When To Sell

    Spinoffs can create great investing opportunities, but there's a time to stick around and a time to jump ship.
  4. Entrepreneurship

    Biggest Merger and Acquisition Disasters

    Find out which companies collapsed after merging.
  5. Options & Futures

    What Makes An M&A Deal Work?

    Do you know why companies merge? Here we'll take a look at three successful company acquisitions and why they succeeded.
  6. Investing

    What a Family Tradition Taught Me About Investing

    We share some lessons from friends and family on saving money and planning for retirement.
  7. Professionals

    4 Must Watch Films and Documentaries for Accountants

    Learn how these must-watch movies for accountants teach about the importance of ethics in a world driven by greed and financial power.
  8. Active Trading

    An Introduction To Depreciation

    Companies make choices and assumptions in calculating depreciation, and you need to know how these affect the bottom line.
  9. Markets

    Operating Cash Flow: Better Than Net Income?

    Differences between accrual accounting and cash flows show why net income is easier to manipulate.
  10. Investing Basics

    How To Efficiently Read An Annual Report

    Annual reports are clearly prepared without any intent to deceive or mislead investors. Still, investors should read them with a dose of skepticism.
  1. What is the difference between the equity method and the proportional consolidation ...

    The equity and proportional consolidation accounting methods are distinguished from one another by how a company's balance ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Can working capital be depreciated?

    Working capital as current assets cannot be depreciated the way long-term, fixed assets are. In accounting, depreciation ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Do working capital funds expire?

    While working capital funds do not expire, the working capital figure does change over time. This is because it is calculated ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How much working capital does a small business need?

    The amount of working capital a small business needs to run smoothly depends largely on the type of business, its operating ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What does high working capital say about a company's financial prospects?

    If a company has high working capital, it has more than enough liquid funds to meet its short-term obligations. Working capital, ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How can working capital affect a company's finances?

    Working capital, or total current assets minus total current liabilities, can affect a company's longer-term investment effectiveness ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Take A Bath

    A slang term referring to the situation of an investor who has experienced a large loss from an investment or speculative ...
  2. Black Friday

    1. A day of stock market catastrophe. Originally, September 24, 1869, was deemed Black Friday. The crash was sparked by gold ...
  3. Turkey

    Slang for an investment that yields disappointing results or turns out worse than expected. Failed business deals, securities ...
  4. Barefoot Pilgrim

    A slang term for an unsophisticated investor who loses all of his or her wealth by trading equities in the stock market. ...
  5. Quick Ratio

    The quick ratio is an indicator of a company’s short-term liquidity. The quick ratio measures a company’s ability to meet ...
  6. Black Tuesday

    October 29, 1929, when the DJIA fell 12% - one of the largest one-day drops in stock market history. More than 16 million ...
Trading Center