Proportional Spread

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Proportional Spread'

A measure of a security's liquidity that is calculated by comparing the bid and ask prices quoted in the marketplace. The proportional spread is higher as liquidity decreases to compensate the dealer for the additional risk of creating a market in an illiquid security.

The proportional spread is calculated as the difference between closing ask and bid prices divided by the average price of the bid and ask.

Proportional Spread



Ask = Highest close in month
Bid = Lowest close in month

Also referred to as a proportional bid-ask spread.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Proportional Spread'

The proportional spread is used to give an idea of the average round-trip transaction compensation to dealers. The average transaction cost to the investor is calculated as one-half of the proportional spread. In general, proportional spreads can range from less than 1% to over 5%. For example, the average proportional spread on the New York Stock Exchange was 0.6% in 2003.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Ask Size

    The amount of a security that a market maker is offering to sell ...
  2. Ask

    The price a seller is willing to accept for a security, also ...
  3. Bid Size

    The number of shares being offered for purchase at a specified ...
  4. Illiquid

    The state of a security or other asset that cannot easily be ...
  5. Bid-Ask Spread

    The amount by which the ask price exceeds the bid. This is essentially ...
  6. Bid

    1. An offer made by an investor, a trader or a dealer to buy ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. Why are the bid and ask quotes usually so far away from each other in after-hours ...

    After-hours trading is defined as the exchange of securities outside of an exchange's specified regular trading hours (usually ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    The Basics Of The Bid-Ask Spread

    The bid-ask spread is essentially a negotiation in progress. To be successful, traders must be willing to take a stand and walk away in the bid-ask process through limit orders.
  2. Trading Strategies

    Setting Vs. Getting: What Is A Price-Taker?

    Learn how the economic term "price taker" may separate investors from traders.
  3. Options & Futures

    Don't Let Brokerage Fees Undermine Your Returns

    Smart investors don't give away more money than necessary in commissions and fees. Find out how to save.
  4. Economics

    Understanding Perpetuity

    Perpetuity means without end. In finance, a perpetuity is a flow of money that will be received on a regular basis without a specified ending date.
  5. Fundamental Analysis

    What is a Null Hypothesis?

    In statistics, a null hypothesis is assumed true until proven otherwise.
  6. Trading Strategies

    Risk Management Techniques For Shorting Call Options

    Shorting covered calls is a popular options trade strategy. Here are the methods to mitigate the risk/loss and enhance profits for selling covered calls
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    Making Sense Of The Dow Reaching Record Levels

    When gauging the Dow's shifts in order to assess the U.S. economy and make investment decisions, one must know what the Dow represents,and what it doesn't.
  8. Economics

    How A Limited Government Affects A Country's Finances

    Countries with limited governments have fewer laws about what individuals and businesses can and can’t do. What's the net result?
  9. Investing Basics

    What Does The Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) Quote Represent?

    “The Dow” is regarded as the “pulse of the stock market,” as it is one of the most quoted and followed stock market indices by investors, market professionals and media.
  10. Investing Basics

    How Does Goodwill Affect Financial Statements?

    Goodwill is a bit of a paradox--intangible, yet it is recorded as an asset on the purchasing company's balance sheet.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Asset Class

    A group of securities that exhibit similar characteristics, behave similarly in the marketplace, and are subject to the same ...
  2. Fiat Money

    Currency that a government has declared to be legal tender, but is not backed by a physical commodity. The value of fiat ...
  3. Interest Rate Risk

    The risk that an investment's value will change due to a change in the absolute level of interest rates, in the spread between ...
  4. Income Effect

    In the context of economic theory, the income effect is the change in an individual's or economy's income and how that change ...
  5. Price-To-Sales Ratio - PSR

    A valuation ratio that compares a company’s stock price to its revenues. The price-to-sales ratio is an indicator of the ...
  6. Hurdle Rate

    The minimum rate of return on a project or investment required by a manager or investor. In order to compensate for risk, ...
Trading Center