Proxy Directive

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DEFINITION of 'Proxy Directive'

A legal document assigning the health-care decisions of an individual to another in the event the individual is unable to make the decisions for themselves.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Proxy Directive'

If you as a capable individual wanted to assign your children the right to make all health-care decisions should you become incapacitated, you would need to create a proxy directive. The proxy (the assigned decision-maker) is only in charge of making decisions related to your health. They cannot access your money and are not bound to pay your bills.

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