Proxy Fight

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DEFINITION of 'Proxy Fight'

When a group of shareholders are persuaded to join forces and gather enough shareholder proxies to win a corporate vote. This is referred to also as a proxy battle.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Proxy Fight'

This term is used mainly in the context of takeovers. The acquirer will persuade existing shareholders to vote out company management so that the company will be easier to takeover.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Under what circumstances might a company decide to do a hostile takeover?

    A company may decide to attempt a hostile takeover if the target company's board of directors is not open to negotiations ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How can investors influence the c-suite?

    Investors in publicly traded firms can influence C-suite executives by exercising voting rights or engaging in investor activism. ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How do proxy fights work?

    A proxy fight occurs when a group of shareholders in a particular company attempts to join together to effect change in ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How long does it take to execute an M&A deal?

    Even the simplest merger and acquisition (M&A) deals are challenging. It takes a lot for two previously independent enterprises ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What happens to the shares of stock purchased in a tender offer?

    The shares of stock purchased in a tender offer become the property of the purchaser. From that point forward, the purchaser, ... Read Full Answer >>
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