Proxy Fight

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DEFINITION of 'Proxy Fight'

When a group of shareholders are persuaded to join forces and gather enough shareholder proxies to win a corporate vote. This is referred to also as a proxy battle.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Proxy Fight'

This term is used mainly in the context of takeovers. The acquirer will persuade existing shareholders to vote out company management so that the company will be easier to takeover.

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