Proxy Materials

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DEFINITION of 'Proxy Materials'

Documents regulated by the Securities & Exchange Commission in which a public company outlines its methods and procedures. These documents are used to inform shareholders and solicit votes for corporate decisions, such as the election of directors and other corporate actions.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Proxy Materials'

SEC regulations require a public company to disclose specific information in its proxy materials, so that investors can be clear on the procedures to follow in certain circumstances. For example, a company's proxy materials must specify if there is a standard process for shareholders to contact the board of directors, and if one does not exist, the proxy materials must provide specific reasons for the absence of such a process.

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