Proxy Materials


DEFINITION of 'Proxy Materials'

Documents regulated by the Securities & Exchange Commission in which a public company outlines its methods and procedures. These documents are used to inform shareholders and solicit votes for corporate decisions, such as the election of directors and other corporate actions.

BREAKING DOWN 'Proxy Materials'

SEC regulations require a public company to disclose specific information in its proxy materials, so that investors can be clear on the procedures to follow in certain circumstances. For example, a company's proxy materials must specify if there is a standard process for shareholders to contact the board of directors, and if one does not exist, the proxy materials must provide specific reasons for the absence of such a process.

  1. Board Of Directors - B Of D

    A group of individuals that are elected as, or elected to act ...
  2. Shareholder

    Any person, company or other institution that owns at least one ...
  3. SEC Form DEFS14C

    A now-obsolete filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission ...
  4. SEC Form DEFM14C

    A filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) that ...
  5. Corporate Action

    Any event that brings material change to a company and affects ...
  6. Voting Right

    The right of a stockholder to vote on matters of corporate policy ...
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