Public Offering Price - POP

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Public Offering Price - POP'

The price at which new issues of stock are offered to the public by an underwriter. Because the goal of an IPO is to raise money, underwriters must determine a public offering price that will be alluring to investors. When underwriters determine the public offering price, they look at factors such as the strength of the company's financial statements, how profitable it is, public trends, growth rates and even investor confidence.

BREAKING DOWN 'Public Offering Price - POP'

Investors and analysts sometimes use the initial public offering price as a benchmark against which a stock's current price can be compared. If a company's share price rises significantly above its initial public offering price, the company is considered to be performing well. However, if the share price later dips below its initial public offering price, this is considered a sign that investors have lost confidence in the company's ability to create value.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Price Band

    A value-setting method in which a seller indicates an upper and ...
  2. Final Prospectus

    1. The final version of a prospectus for a public offering of ...
  3. Underwriting

    1. The process by which investment bankers raise investment capital ...
  4. Primary Market

    A market that issues new securities on an exchange. Companies, ...
  5. Oversubscribed

    A situation in which the demand for an initial public offering ...
  6. Initial Public Offering - IPO

    The first sale of stock by a private company to the public. IPOs ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    A Look At Primary And Secondary Markets

    Knowing how the primary and secondary markets work is key to understanding how stocks trade.
  2. Fundamental Analysis

    Interpreting A Company's IPO Prospectus Report

    Learn to decipher the secret language of the IPO prospectus report - it can tell you a lot about a company's future.
  3. Investing Basics

    5 Tips For Investing In IPOs

    Thinking of investing in IPOs? Here are five things to remember before jumping into these murky waters.
  4. Retirement

    IPO Basics Tutorial

    What's an IPO, and how did everybody get so rich off them during the dotcom boom? We give you the scoop.
  5. Investing Basics

    Explaining Rehypothecation

    Rehypothecation occurs when an asset used as collateral for one party is reused in another transaction.
  6. Investing

    Career Choice: Bulge Bracket Vs. Boutique Bank

    Bulge bracket banks offer higher salaries and prestige. But boutique banks are rapidly gaining market share and may offer better work/life balance and job security.
  7. Investing Basics

    If You Had Invested Right After Amazon's IPO

    Find out how much you would have made if you had invested $1,000 during Amazon's IPO, including how the power of the stock split affects investment growth.
  8. Entrepreneurship

    Top 10 Startups That Emerged in New York City

    Understand why the startup scene has grown, and discover why it has become a large part of New York City. Learn about the top 10 New York City startups.
  9. Entrepreneurship

    Top 10 Startups That Emerged in Chicago

    Understand why Chicago has become one of the best places to work or start a new business. Learn about the top 10 startups in Chicago.
  10. Entrepreneurship

    Top 5 Startups That Emerged in Detroit

    Learn how startups are changing the face of Detroit, a city long dominated by large corporations, and identify the specific Detroit startups leading the trend.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What does 'going public' mean?

    Going public refers to a private company's initial public offering (IPO), thus becoming a publicly traded and owned entity. ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How does investment banking differ from commercial banking?

    Investment banking and commercial banking are two primary segments of the banking industry. Investment banks facilitate the ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What kind of assets can be traded on a secondary market?

    Virtually all types of financial assets and investing instruments are traded on secondary markets, including stocks, bonds, ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How do you find the break-even point using a payback period?

    It does not make sense to find the breakeven point using a company's payback period. A company's payback period is concerned ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Why would a company decide to utilize H-shares over A-shares in its IPO?

    A company would decide to utilize H shares over A shares in its initial public offering (IPO) if that company believes it ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is considered a reasonable interest rate for a syndicated loan?

    A 2010 survey of syndicated loans found an average interest rate of 7.9%. However, the majority of syndicated loans are floating ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Dead Cat Bounce

    A temporary recovery from a prolonged decline or bear market, followed by the continuation of the downtrend. A dead cat bounce ...
  2. Bear Market

    A market condition in which the prices of securities are falling, and widespread pessimism causes the negative sentiment ...
  3. Alligator Spread

    An unprofitable spread that occurs as a result of large commissions charged on the transaction, regardless of favorable market ...
  4. Tiger Cub Economies

    The four Southeast Asian economies of Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand. Tiger cub economy indicates that ...
  5. Gorilla

    A company that dominates an industry without having a complete monopoly. A gorilla firm has large control of the pricing ...
  6. Elephants

    Slang for large institutions that have the funds to make high volumes trades. Due to the large volumes of stock that elephants ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!