Public Offering Price - POP

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DEFINITION of 'Public Offering Price - POP'

The price at which new issues of stock are offered to the public by an underwriter. Because the goal of an IPO is to raise money, underwriters must determine a public offering price that will be alluring to investors. When underwriters determine the public offering price, they look at factors such as the strength of the company's financial statements, how profitable it is, public trends, growth rates and even investor confidence.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Public Offering Price - POP'

Investors and analysts sometimes use the initial public offering price as a benchmark against which a stock's current price can be compared. If a company's share price rises significantly above its initial public offering price, the company is considered to be performing well. However, if the share price later dips below its initial public offering price, this is considered a sign that investors have lost confidence in the company's ability to create value.

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