Puke

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DEFINITION of 'Puke'

A slang term describing the sale of a security or other asset regardless of how much loss will be incurred. Investors may "puke" if the value of an asset plummets, specifically if investors want to recoup a small amount of the original investment's cost.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Puke'

The point at which an investor decides to sell regardless of price is called "the puke point." An investor who has reached the puke point is unwilling to take any additional loss on the value of the investment. Investors looking to purchase an asset may wait until the puke point is reached in order to snap up bargains.

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