Pull To Par


DEFINITION of 'Pull To Par'

The movement of a bond's price toward its face value as it approaches its maturity date. Premium bonds, which trade at a higher price than their face (par) value, will decrease in price as they approach maturity. Discount bonds, which trade at a lower price than their par value, will increase in price as they approach maturity.


Pull to par reflects the fact that investors require a specific return on their bond investment, given the bond's characteristics and overall market conditions. If investors require a 5% return, a premium bond that is issued for $106 will move toward $100 as it approaches maturity, and a discount bond that is issued for $96 will move toward $100 as it approaches maturity. The par bond's value will hold steady at $100.

  1. Discount Bond

    A bond that is issued for less than its par (or face) value, ...
  2. Bond

    A debt investment in which an investor loans money to an entity ...
  3. Par Value

    The face value of a bond. Par value for a share refers to the ...
  4. Maturity Date

    The date on which the principal amount of a note, draft, acceptance ...
  5. Premium Bond

    1) A bond that is trading above its par value. A bond will trade ...
  6. Below Par

    A term describing a bond whose price is below the face value ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    Achieving Optimal Asset Allocation

    Minimizing risk while maximizing return is any investor's prime goal. The right mix of securities is the key to achieving your optimal asset allocation.
  2. Investing

    The Advantages Of Bonds

    Bonds contribute an element of stability to almost any portfolio and offer a safe and conservative investment.
  3. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Corporate Bonds: An Introduction To Credit Risk

    Corporate bonds offer higher yields, but it's important to evaluate the extra risk involved before you buy.
  4. Investing Basics

    Interest Rates And Your Bond Investments

    By understanding the factors that influence interest rates, you can learn to anticipate their movement and profit from it.
  5. Home & Auto

    The Bear On Bonds

    Bond investing is a stable and low-risk way to diversify a portfolio. However, knowing which types of bonds are right for you is not always easy.
  6. Savings

    Become Your Own Financial Advisor

    If you have some financial know-how, you don’t have to hire someone to advise you on investments. This tutorial will help you set goals – and get started.
  7. Investing Basics

    What Does Plain Vanilla Mean?

    Plain vanilla is a term used in investing to describe the most basic types of financial instruments.
  8. Investing

    How to Win More by Losing Less in Today’s Markets

    The further you fall, the harder it is to climb back up. It’s a universal truth that is painfully apparent in the investing world.
  9. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Top 4 Investment Grade Corporate Bonds ETFs

    Discover detailed analysis and information about some of the top exchange-traded funds (ETFs) that offer exposure to the investment-grade corporate bond market.
  10. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Trading Mutual Funds For Beginners

    Learn about the basics of trading and investing in mutual funds. Understand how the fees charged by mutual funds can impact the performance of an investment.
  1. What are the risks of annuities in a recession?

    Annuities come in several forms, the two most common being fixed annuities and variable annuities. During a recession, variable ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Are high yield bonds a good investment?

    Bonds are rated according to their risk of default by independent credit rating agencies such as Moody's, Standard & ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Do mutual funds invest only in stocks?

    Mutual funds invest in stocks, but certain types also invest in government and corporate bonds. Stocks are subject to the ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the relationship between the current yield and risk?

    The general relationship between current yield and risk is that they increase in correlation to one another. A higher current ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How does the bond market react to changes in the Federal Funds Rate?

    The bond market is highly sensitive to changes in the federal funds rate. When the Federal Reserve increases the federal ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How do I use the holding period return yield to evaluate my bond portfolio?

    The holding period return yield formula can be used to compare the yields of different bonds in your portfolio over a given ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Zero-Sum Game

    A situation in which one person’s gain is equivalent to another’s loss, so that the net change in wealth or benefit is zero. ...
  2. Capitalization Rate

    The rate of return on a real estate investment property based on the income that the property is expected to generate.
  3. Gross Profit

    A company's total revenue (equivalent to total sales) minus the cost of goods sold. Gross profit is the profit a company ...
  4. Revenue

    The amount of money that a company actually receives during a specific period, including discounts and deductions for returned ...
  5. Normal Profit

    An economic condition occurring when the difference between a firm’s total revenue and total cost is equal to zero.
  6. Operating Cost

    Expenses associated with the maintenance and administration of a business on a day-to-day basis.
Trading Center
You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!