DEFINITION of 'Pundit'

A person that publicly expresses their opinions or comments on a topic on which they consider themselves an expert. The term "pundit" can be used to describe someone that is actually an expert in a field, and can also be used in a negative sense to classify someone who has definite opinions, but does not have the expertise to back them up. It is used to describe recognized authorities and, increasingly, to describe TV and radio hosts that are seen to be louder than they are learned.


Examples from the finance world would be a well-known market analyst that publicly gives 'buy' and 'sell' recommendations on stocks or a business columnist who writes opinion pieces for a national newspaper.

In modern usage, the term pundit is often used to describe media personalities who are vocal proponents or critics of certain political ideologies, sports teams, investments, social issues, etc. The terms "right-wing pundit" and "left-wing pundit" are used to describe outspoken conservative and liberal figures, respectively.

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