Put Swaption

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Put Swaption'

An option on an interest rate swap that gives the option buyer the right to pay a fixed rate of interest, and receive a floating rate of interest from the option seller / swap counterparty. The buyer of a put swaption expects interest rates to rise and is hedging against this possibility, while the seller of a put swaption expects interest rates to fall. Settlement of swaptions is usually on a cash basis.

Also known as a payer swaption.

BREAKING DOWN 'Put Swaption'

Swaption market participants are generally large companies and financial institutions. As an example, consider an institution that has a large amount of floating-rate debt and wishes to hedge its exposure to rising interest rates. By buying a put swaption, the institution converts its floating-rate liability to a fixed-rate one for the duration of the swap. Should interest rates rise as anticipated, the company will receive the difference between the rates in cash on each date on which debt repayment is due.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Interest Rate Swap

    An agreement between two parties (known as counterparties) where ...
  2. Currency Swap

    A swap that involves the exchange of principal and interest in ...
  3. Credit Default Swap - CDS

    A swap designed to transfer the credit exposure of fixed income ...
  4. Swaption (Swap Option)

    The option to enter into an interest rate swap. In exchange for ...
  5. Swap

    Traditionally, the exchange of one security for another to change ...
  6. Implied Volatility - IV

    The estimated volatility of a security's price.
Related Articles
  1. Insurance

    Credit Default Swaps: What Happens In A Credit Event?

    The credit crisis of 2008 prompted important changes to the settlement of credit default swaps.
  2. Options & Futures

    An Introduction To Swaps

    Learn how these derivatives work and how companies can benefit from them.
  3. Bonds & Fixed Income

    The Advantages Of Bond Swapping

    This technique can add diversity to your portfolio and lower your taxes. Find out how.
  4. Options & Futures

    5 Equity Derivatives And How They Work

    These derivatives allow investors to transfer risk, but there are many choices and factors that investors must weigh before buying in.
  5. Options & Futures

    Use Options to Hedge Against Iron Ore Downslide

    Using iron ore options is a way to take advantage of a current downslide in iron ore prices, whether for producers or traders.
  6. Home & Auto

    Understanding Rent-to-Own Contracts

    They can work for you or against you. Here's how to negotiate a fair one.
  7. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Top 3 Switzerland ETFs

    Explore detailed analysis and information of the top three Swiss exchange-traded funds that offer exposure to the Swiss equities market.
  8. Home & Auto

    Avoiding the 5 Most Common Rent-to-Own Mistakes

    Pitfalls that a prospective tenant-buyer could encounter on the road to purchase – and how not to stumble into them.
  9. Home & Auto

    Renting vs. Owning: Which is Better for You?

    Despite the conventional wisdom, renting might make more financial sense than you think.
  10. Investing Basics

    Explaining Options Contracts

    Options contracts grant the owner the right to buy or sell shares of a security in the future at a given price.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is a Bermuda swaption?

    The Bermuda swaption refers to a modified American style of option. A swaption is an option on an interest rate swap in ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How does a forward contract differ from a call option?

    Forward contracts and call options are different financial instruments that allow two parties to purchase or sell assets ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Why do companies enter into futures contracts?

    Different types of companies may enter into futures contracts for different purposes. The most common reason is to hedge ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How can I hedge my portfolio to protect from a decline in the food and beverage sector?

    The food and beverage sector exhibits greater volatility than the broader market and tends to suffer larger-than-average ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What techniques are most useful for hedging exposure to the insurance sector?

    Investing style determines the best hedging techniques for the insurance sector. This sector comprises three segments, two ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How can I hedge my portfolio to protect from a decline in the retail sector?

    The retail sector provides growth investors with a great opportunity for better-than-average gains during periods of market ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Stock Market Crash

    A rapid and often unanticipated drop in stock prices. A stock market crash can be the result of major catastrophic events, ...
  2. Financial Crisis

    A situation in which the value of financial institutions or assets drops rapidly. A financial crisis is often associated ...
  3. Election Period

    The period of time during which an investor who owns an extendable or retractable bond must indicate to the issuer whether ...
  4. Shanghai Stock Exchange

    The largest stock exchange in mainland China, the Shanghai Stock Exchange is a nonprofit organization run by the China Securities ...
  5. Dead Cat Bounce

    A temporary recovery from a prolonged decline or bear market, followed by the continuation of the downtrend. A dead cat bounce ...
  6. Bear Market

    A market condition in which the prices of securities are falling, and widespread pessimism causes the negative sentiment ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!