Pyrrhic Victory

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Pyrrhic Victory'

A victory or success that comes at the expense of great losses or costs. In business, examples of such a victory could be succeeding at a hostile takeover bid or winning a lengthy and expensive lawsuit.


INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Pyrrhic Victory'

In 2001, Microsoft won a Pyrrhic victory in its antitrust case when the Appeals Court decided the software giant was not to be broken up. However, Microsoft was still branded a monopoly and was subject to other punishment.

The expression alludes to the Greek King Pyrrhus who, after defeating the Romans in battle, stated: "If we win another such battle against the Romans, we will be completely lost."

RELATED TERMS
  1. Baby Bills

    A hypothetical nickname for the smaller companies that would ...
  2. Antitrust

    The antitrust laws apply to virtually all industries and to every ...
  3. Hostile Takeover

    The acquisition of one company (called the target company) by ...
  4. Monopoly

    A situation in which a single company or group owns all or nearly ...
  5. Bulldog Market

    A nickname for the foreign bond market of the United Kingdom. ...
  6. Sharing Economy

    An economic model in which individuals are able to borrow or ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing

    What was the Mahonia company and why did it become the subject of a lawsuit?

    In 1992, J.P.Morgan went into the energy trading business by creating a venture company called Mahonia Limited. At least, that is how things appeared on paper. Mahonia was actually a type of ...
  2. Home & Auto

    How You Make Money In Real Estate

    If you're interested in the real estate game, make sure you know what factors will affect whether you make money or not.
  3. Personal Finance

    Antitrust Defined

    Check out the history and reasons behind antitrust laws, as well as the arguments over them.
  4. Personal Finance

    Litigation: Are Your Investments At Risk?

    Don't let company lawsuits hit you unprepared. Learn how to uncover how they might affect you.
  5. Fundamental Analysis

    What is the affect of the invisible hand on consumers?

    Discover how consumers help initiate and benefit from the invisible hand of the market, which naturally coordinates trade in an exchange economy.
  6. Economics

    How does the invisible hand phenomenon affect investment markets?

    Read about how the invisible hand of the market coordinates investment markets and provides social benefit and why its effects are distorted along the way.
  7. Economics

    How is the invisible hand affected in a communist or socialist economy?

    Discover why the invisible hand of the market is compromised by socialist and communist economies, where the government controls the means of production.
  8. Economics

    What is the affect of the invisible hand on the government?

    Find out why government policy goals are often frustrated by the same forces that guide the invisible hand of the market towards efficient outcomes.
  9. Fundamental Analysis

    What are some examples of economies of scale?

    Take a look at different examples of economies of scale, including how marginal costs can be reduced through external and internal factors.
  10. Taxes

    What are the tax incentives or disincentives to vertical integration?

    Merging companies through vertical integration can provide companies in the United States with a marginally advantageous position in terms of taxation.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Treasury Bond - T-Bond

    A marketable, fixed-interest U.S. government debt security with a maturity of more than 10 years. Treasury bonds make interest ...
  2. Weight Of Ice, Snow Or Sleet Insurance

    Financial protection against damage caused to property by winter weather specifically, damage caused if a roof caves in because ...
  3. Weather Insurance

    A type of protection against a financial loss that may be incurred because of rain, snow, storms, wind, fog, undesirable ...
  4. Portfolio Turnover

    A measure of how frequently assets within a fund are bought and sold by the managers. Portfolio turnover is calculated by ...
  5. Commercial Paper

    An unsecured, short-term debt instrument issued by a corporation, typically for the financing of accounts receivable, inventories ...
  6. Federal Funds Rate

    The interest rate at which a depository institution lends funds maintained at the Federal Reserve to another depository institution ...
Trading Center