Qualified Institutional Placement - QIP

DEFINITION of 'Qualified Institutional Placement - QIP'

A designation of a securities issue given by the Securities and Exchange Board of India (SEBI) that allows an Indian-listed company to raise capital from its domestic markets without the need to submit any pre-issue filings to market regulators. The SEBI instituted the guidelines for this relatively new Indian financing avenue on May 8, 2006.

BREAKING DOWN 'Qualified Institutional Placement - QIP'

Prior to the innovation of the qualified institutional placement, there was concern from Indian market regulators and authorities that Indian companies were accessing international funding via issuing securities, such as American depository receipts (ADRs), in outside markets. This was seen as an undesirable export of the domestic equity market, so the QIP guidelines were introduced to encourage Indian companies to raise funds domestically instead of tapping overseas markets.

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RELATED FAQS
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    Foreign markets have always been an object of envy to domestic investors because the indexes in some foreign countries have ... Read Full Answer >>
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