Qualified Institutional Placement - QIP

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DEFINITION of 'Qualified Institutional Placement - QIP'

A designation of a securities issue given by the Securities and Exchange Board of India (SEBI) that allows an Indian-listed company to raise capital from its domestic markets without the need to submit any pre-issue filings to market regulators. The SEBI instituted the guidelines for this relatively new Indian financing avenue on May 8, 2006.

BREAKING DOWN 'Qualified Institutional Placement - QIP'

Prior to the innovation of the qualified institutional placement, there was concern from Indian market regulators and authorities that Indian companies were accessing international funding via issuing securities, such as American depository receipts (ADRs), in outside markets. This was seen as an undesirable export of the domestic equity market, so the QIP guidelines were introduced to encourage Indian companies to raise funds domestically instead of tapping overseas markets.

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RELATED FAQS
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    American depositary receipts (ADRs) allow foreign equities to be traded on U.S. stock exchanges; in fact, this is how the ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Why are big foreign companies considering delisting their American depositary receipts?

    American depositary receipts (ADRs) were developed to give investors an easier way to invest in foreign companies. An ADR ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why would a corporation issue convertible bonds?

    A convertible bond represents a hybrid security that has bond and equity features; this type of bond allows the conversion ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between shares outstanding and floating stock?

    Shares outstanding and floating stock are different measures of the shares of a particular stock. Shares outstanding is the ... Read Full Answer >>
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