Qualified Professional Asset Manager - QPAM

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DEFINITION of 'Qualified Professional Asset Manager - QPAM'

A registered investment advisor/manager. The criteria for qualifying as a QPAM are defined by the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA). Regulated institutions such as banks and insurance companies may qualify as a QPAM. Under amendments that came into effect in August 2005, a QPAM is also defined as a registered investment adviser with client assets under management of at least $85 million, and shareholders' or partners' equity in excess of $1 million.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Qualified Professional Asset Manager - QPAM'

The QPAM exemption is widely used by parties who conduct transactions with accounts holding retirement plan funds. Essentially, the QPAM exemption allows an investment fund that is managed by a QPAM to engage in a wide range of transactions (such as sales, exchanges and leases, and the provision of goods and services) - that would otherwise be prohibited by ERISA - with practically all parties in interest such as plan sponsors and fiduciaries. However, such transactions cannot be entered into with the QPAM itself or with those parties that may have the power to influence the QPAM.

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