Qualified Savings Bond

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DEFINITION of 'Qualified Savings Bond'

Refers to a series EE savings bond which has been issued after December 1989 and purchased by an individual at least 24 years of age.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Qualified Savings Bond'

The interest from this type of bond is tax-free if you redeem it to pay for a higher education expense.

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