Quarter To Date - QTD

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DEFINITION of 'Quarter To Date - QTD'

A time interval that captures all relevant company activity that occurred between the beginning of the current quarter and the time in which the data was gathered. Quarter to date information is typically gathered in situations when the entire quarterly period has not ended yet, and it can allow management to see how the quarter is shaping up.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Quarter To Date - QTD'

For example, a company may have software that is tracking its revenue for the quarter to date. If the information is suggesting that QTD revenue is dramatically lower than the same quarter from last year, this updated data will allow management to start looking for trends to see what is different compared to last year. Further analysis can also determine if any changes will need to be made in order to improve the situation.

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