Qualified Widow Or Widower

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DEFINITION of 'Qualified Widow Or Widower'

The least common of the five types of tax filing status each taxpayer must select from when preparing their personal tax return. A qualified widow or widower is entitled to use the "married filing jointly" tax rates on an individual return for up to two years following the death of the spouse.

BREAKING DOWN 'Qualified Widow Or Widower'

The qualified widow or widower status is provided as a measure of financial relief for those who have lost their spouse and may be struggling with medical or funeral bills. After two years, surviving spouses who have not remarried must file as either single or head of household.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. How does the marginal tax rate system work?

    The marginal tax rate is the rate of tax that income earners incur on each additional dollar of income. As the marginal tax ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Does everyone have to file a federal tax return?

    This may come as a surprise to many individuals, but not everyone needs to file a federal tax return. According to the IRS, ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the difference between comprehensive income and gross income?

    Comprehensive income and gross income are similar, but comprehensive income is a specific term used on a company's financial ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What tax breaks are afforded to a qualifying widow?

    The tax breaks accorded to qualifying widows or widowers include being able to use a tax filing status that allows for a ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How is income taxed on prorated salary?

    Since yearly income is viewed by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) as the total amount of income a person has made over ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How can I tell which of my business expenses count as write-offs?

    Any basic, reasonably necessary expenses incurred in running a business can be considered possible write-offs. Such expenses ... Read Full Answer >>

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