Quantity Theory Of Money

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DEFINITION of 'Quantity Theory Of Money'

An economic theory which proposes a positive relationship between changes in the money supply and the long-term price of goods. It states that increasing the amount of money in the economy will eventually lead to an equal percentage rise in the prices of products and services. The calculation behind the quantity theory of money is based upon Fisher Equation:

Calculated as:

Quantity Theory Of Money



Where:
M represents the money supply.
V represents the velocity of money.
P represents the average price level.
T represents the volume of transactions in the economy.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Quantity Theory Of Money'

This theory originated in the sixteenth century as European economists noticed higher levels of inflation associated with importing gold or silver from the Americas.

According to how the formula is derived, holding the transaction volume and velocity of money constant, any increases in the money supply will yield a proportional increase in the average price level.

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