Quick Assets

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Quick Assets'

Anything having commercial or exchange value that can easily be converted into cash, or that is already in cash form. Quick assets are the highly liquid assets held by a company, including cash, marketable securities and accounts receivable. Quick assets are often calculated as current assets (cash + marketable securities + accounts receivable) minus inventories (since inventories are often a firm's least-liquid current assets). Quick assets are used by companies to calculate certain financial ratios that are used in decision making, including the quick ratio.

BREAKING DOWN 'Quick Assets'

The quick ratio (sometimes called the quick asset ratio or "acid test") is a financial ratio that divides a company's cash + marketable securities + accounts receivable by its current liabilities.

By keeping inventories out of the equation, the quick ratio allows the company to focus on its quick assets – those that could be quickly converted to cash – and helps the company determine if it could meet its financial obligations if sales (and revenues) were to cease.

The current ratio, on the other hand, is equal to current assets (including inventories and any assets that could be converted into cash within a "normal" 12-month operating period) divided by current liabilities.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Current Assets

    A balance sheet account that represents the value of all assets ...
  2. Current Ratio

    The current ratio is a liquidity ratio measuring a company's ...
  3. Quick Ratio

    An indicator of a company’s short-term liquidity. The quick ratio ...
  4. Spontaneous Assets

    The assets of a company that are accumulated automatically as ...
  5. Goodwill To Assets Ratio

    A ratio that measures how much goodwill a company is recording ...
  6. Inventory

    The raw materials, work-in-process goods and completely finished ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    Analyze Investments Quickly With Ratios

    Make informed decisions about your investments with these easy equations.
  2. Personal Finance

    Breaking Down The Balance Sheet

    Knowing what the company's financial statements mean will help you to analyze your investments.
  3. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Major Blunders In Portfolio Construction

    Do you have the best mix of investments? Find out how to make sure.
  4. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Money Market Mutual Funds: A Better Savings Account

    An good alternative to the traditional savings account is the money market mutual fund. It's easy, safe and has better returns.
  5. Fundamental Analysis

    Dynamic Current Ratio: What It Is And How To Use It

    Learn why this ratio may be a good alternative to the current, cash and quick ratios.
  6. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: iShares Morningstar Small-Cap Value

    Find out about the Shares Morningstar Small-Cap Value ETF, and learn detailed information about this exchange-traded fund that focuses on small-cap equities.
  7. Investing

    How To Calculate Minority Interest

    Minority interest calculations require the use of minority shareholders’ percentage ownership of a subsidiary, after controlling interest is acquired.
  8. Professionals

    Don't Let Your Portfolio Be Trump'd by Illiquidity

    A look at Donald Trump's statement of finances and the biggest lesson every investor can learn.
  9. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: WisdomTree SmallCap Earnings

    Discover the WisdomTree Small Cap Earnings ETF, a fund with a special focus on small-cap and micro-cap stocks with positive earnings.
  10. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: iShares US Regional Banks

    Obtain information and analysis of the iShares US Regional Banks ETF for investors seeking particular exposure to regional bank stocks.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the formula for calculating compound annual growth rate (CAGR) in Excel?

    The compound annual growth rate, or CAGR for short, measures the return on an investment over a certain period of time. Below ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are some examples of general and administrative expenses?

    In accounting, general and administrative expenses represent the necessary costs to maintain a company's daily operations ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the difference between called-up share capital and paid-up share capital?

    The difference between called-up share capital and paid-up share capital is investors have already paid in full for paid-up ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why can additional paid in capital never have a negative balance?

    The additional paid-in capital figure on a company's balance sheet can never be negative because companies do not pay investors ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. When does the fixed charge coverage ratio suggest that a company should stop borrowing ...

    Since the fixed charge coverage ratio indicates the number of times a company is capable of making its fixed charge payments ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the difference between the return on total assets and an interest rate?

    Return on total assets (ROTA) represents one of the profitability metrics. It is calculated by taking a company's earnings ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Alligator Spread

    An unprofitable spread that occurs as a result of large commissions charged on the transaction, regardless of favorable market ...
  2. Tiger Cub Economies

    The four Southeast Asian economies of Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand. Tiger cub economy indicates that ...
  3. Gorilla

    A company that dominates an industry without having a complete monopoly. A gorilla firm has large control of the pricing ...
  4. Elephants

    Slang for large institutions that have the funds to make high volumes trades. Due to the large volumes of stock that elephants ...
  5. Widow's Exemption

    In general terms, a widow's exemption refers to the amount that can be deducted from taxable income by a widow, thereby reducing ...
  6. Wedding Warrant

    A warrant that can only be exercised if the host asset, typically a bond or preferred stock, is surrendered. Until the call ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!