Quarterly Income Debt Securities - QUIDS

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DEFINITION of 'Quarterly Income Debt Securities - QUIDS'

A debt instrument offering guaranteed quarterly payments directly to the shareholder by the parent company. Quarterly Income Debt Securities (QUIDS) were formed by Goldman Sachs & Co. and are sold in small denominations, generally $25. They usually are callable by the issuer in 5 years and with maturities of around 30-50 years.

BREAKING DOWN 'Quarterly Income Debt Securities - QUIDS'

Typically these are senior unsecured debt that rank above preferred securities and on the same level as other unsubordinated and unsecured debt. These securities were made to be similar to Trust Preferred Securities but excluding the trust.

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