Quarterly Income Debt Securities - QUIDS


DEFINITION of 'Quarterly Income Debt Securities - QUIDS'

A debt instrument offering guaranteed quarterly payments directly to the shareholder by the parent company. Quarterly Income Debt Securities (QUIDS) were formed by Goldman Sachs & Co. and are sold in small denominations, generally $25. They usually are callable by the issuer in 5 years and with maturities of around 30-50 years.

BREAKING DOWN 'Quarterly Income Debt Securities - QUIDS'

Typically these are senior unsecured debt that rank above preferred securities and on the same level as other unsubordinated and unsecured debt. These securities were made to be similar to Trust Preferred Securities but excluding the trust.

  1. Maturity

    The period of time for which a financial instrument remains outstanding. ...
  2. Preferred Stock

    A class of ownership in a corporation that has a higher claim ...
  3. Interest

    1. The charge for the privilege of borrowing money, typically ...
  4. Quarterly Income Preferred Securities ...

    Shares that are an interest in a limited partnership that exists ...
  5. Debenture

    A type of debt instrument that is not secured by physical assets ...
  6. Deductible

    1. The amount you have to pay out-of-pocket for expenses before ...
Related Articles
  1. Taxes

    IRA Contributions: Deductions and Tax Credits

    We outline the incentives and help you take full advantage of the benefits.
  2. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Corporate Bonds: An Introduction To Credit Risk

    Corporate bonds offer higher yields, but it's important to evaluate the extra risk involved before you buy.
  3. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Top 4 Investment Grade Corporate Bonds ETFs

    Discover detailed analysis and information about some of the top exchange-traded funds (ETFs) that offer exposure to the investment-grade corporate bond market.
  4. Investing News

    Corporate Bonds or Stocks: Which is Better Now?

    With market volatility high, you may think it is time to run for corporate bonds instead of stocks. Before you do take a deeper look into which is better.
  5. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Top 3 China Bonds ETFs

    Explore detailed analysis of three exchange-traded funds (ETFs) that track the Chinese bond market, and learn about the suitability and characteristics of these ETFs.
  6. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Top 3 International Corporate Bond ETFs

    Explore detailed analysis of international bond ETFs that track the investment-grade and high-yield sectors of the corporate bond market.
  7. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: Vanguard Total International Bond

    Learn about the Vanguard Total International Bond exchange-traded fund, which invests in investment-grade foreign, sovereign and corporate bonds.
  8. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: iShares Floating Rate Bond

    Explore detailed analysis and information of the iShares Floating Rate Bond ETF, and learn how to use this ETF as a defense against rising interest rates.
  9. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: SPDR Barclays Investment Grd Fl Rt

    Learn more about the SPDR Barclays Investment Grade Floating Rate Fund, which tracks an index of highly rated floating debt securities.
  10. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: Vanguard Intermediate-Term Corp Bd

    Learn about the Vanguard Intermediate-Term Corporate Bond ETF, and explore detailed analysis of the fund's characteristics, risks and historical statistics.
  1. What's the difference between bills, notes and bonds?

    Treasury bills (T-Bills), notes and bonds are marketable securities the U.S. government sells in order to pay off maturing ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Why do companies issue debt and bonds? Can't they just borrow from the bank?

    Companies issue bonds to finance operations. Most companies can borrow from banks, but view direct borrowing from a bank ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Do mutual funds invest only in stocks?

    Mutual funds invest in stocks, but certain types also invest in government and corporate bonds. Stocks are subject to the ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the relationship between the current yield and risk?

    The general relationship between current yield and risk is that they increase in correlation to one another. A higher current ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Why would a corporation issue convertible bonds?

    A convertible bond represents a hybrid security that has bond and equity features; this type of bond allows the conversion ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What does it signify if the term structure of an interest rate's curve is positive?

    When the term structure of interest rates is positive, it is a signal to economists the short-term yields on similar bonds ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Term Deposit

    A deposit held at a financial institution that has a fixed term, and guarantees return of principal.
  2. Zero-Sum Game

    A situation in which one person’s gain is equivalent to another’s loss, so that the net change in wealth or benefit is zero. ...
  3. Capitalization Rate

    The rate of return on a real estate investment property based on the income that the property is expected to generate.
  4. Gross Profit

    A company's total revenue (equivalent to total sales) minus the cost of goods sold. Gross profit is the profit a company ...
  5. Revenue

    The amount of money that a company actually receives during a specific period, including discounts and deductions for returned ...
  6. Normal Profit

    An economic condition occurring when the difference between a firm’s total revenue and total cost is equal to zero.
Trading Center
You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!