Quiet Filing

DEFINITION of 'Quiet Filing'

The name given to an IPO filing where important details are intentionally excluded. Sent to the SEC in order to begin the process of issuing a new security, these details must be submitted through amendments. This form of filing generally takes longer than the conventional methods.

BREAKING DOWN 'Quiet Filing'

This type of filing is used when all the details of a new issue are not known. Parties involved in the offering try to ensure that the filings are in place and most of the details correct, reducing the future time spent on paperwork after all the details are ironed out.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Red Herring

    A preliminary prospectus filed by a company with the Securities ...
  2. Prospectus

    A formal legal document, which is required by and filed with ...
  3. Direct Public Offering - DPO

    When a company raises capital by marketing its shares directly ...
  4. Gun Jumping

    1. The illegal practice of soliciting orders to buy a new issue ...
  5. Public Offering Price - POP

    The price at which new issues of stock are offered to the public ...
  6. Underwriting

    1. The process by which investment bankers raise investment capital ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    5 Tips For Investing In IPOs

    Thinking of investing in IPOs? Here are five things to remember before jumping into these murky waters.
  2. Investing Basics

    Analyst Recommendations: Do Sell Ratings Exist?

    Analyst reports can be an investor's best friend - but without knowing how to read them, you won't be able to fully utilize them.
  3. Fundamental Analysis

    Interpreting A Company's IPO Prospectus Report

    Learn to decipher the secret language of the IPO prospectus report - it can tell you a lot about a company's future.
  4. Options & Futures

    The Chinese Wall Protects Against Conflicts Of Interest

    After the crash of 1929, this barrier helped define ethical limits, but it did little to prevent fraud.
  5. Retirement

    IPO Basics Tutorial

    What's an IPO, and how did everybody get so rich off them during the dotcom boom? We give you the scoop.
  6. Stock Analysis

    If You Had Invested Right After Berkshire Hathaway's IPO (BRK.A)

    Learn how much you would now have if you had invested right after Berkshire Hathaway's IPO, and find out the classes of shares that you could invest in.
  7. Stock Analysis

    Is Now the Right Time to Buy Coty? (COTY)

    Find out whether fragrance and color cosmetics powerhouse Coty deserves a place in your portfolio. Will recent acquisitions help turn the company around?
  8. Investing News

    Obama Wants to Double Wall Street Regulation

    President Obama wants to double the budgets of the SEC and the CFTC over the next five years.
  9. Taxes

    Why People Renounce Their U.S Citizenship

    This year, the highest number of Americans ever took the irrevocable step of giving up their citizenship. Here's why.
  10. Personal Finance

    What it Takes to Get a Green Card

    Grounds for getting a green card include having family members in the U.S., being a certain type of refugee or specialized worker, or winning a lottery.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the Writ of Mandamus?

    A writ of mandamus is a court order issued by a judge at a petitioner’s request compelling someone to execute a duty he is ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Are UTMA accounts escheatable?

    Like most financial assets held by institutions such as banks and investment firms, UTMA accounts can be escheated by state ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. When did Facebook go public? (FB)

    Facebook, Inc. (NASDAQ: FB) went public with its initial public offering (IPO) on May 18, 2012. With a peak market capitalization ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the SEC's escheatment process?

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) does not have its own escheatment process. Rather, the SEC notes that the ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Can the IRS audit you after a refund?

    The U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) can audit tax returns even after it has issued a tax refund to a taxpayer. According ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How does escheatment impact a company?

    In recent years, state governments have become increasingly aggressive in enforcing escheatment laws. As a result, many businesses ... Read Full Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Socially Responsible Investment - SRI

    An investment that is considered socially responsible because of the nature of the business the company conducts. Common ...
  2. Presidential Election Cycle (Theory)

    A theory developed by Yale Hirsch that states that U.S. stock markets are weakest in the year following the election of a ...
  3. Super Bowl Indicator

    An indicator based on the belief that a Super Bowl win for a team from the old AFL (AFC division) foretells a decline in ...
  4. Flight To Quality

    The action of investors moving their capital away from riskier investments to the safest possible investment vehicles. This ...
  5. Discouraged Worker

    A person who is eligible for employment and is able to work, but is currently unemployed and has not attempted to find employment ...
  6. Ponzimonium

    After Bernard Madoff's $65 billion Ponzi scheme was revealed, many new (smaller-scale) Ponzi schemers became exposed. Ponzimonium ...
Trading Center