Quiet Filing


DEFINITION of 'Quiet Filing'

The name given to an IPO filing where important details are intentionally excluded. Sent to the SEC in order to begin the process of issuing a new security, these details must be submitted through amendments. This form of filing generally takes longer than the conventional methods.

BREAKING DOWN 'Quiet Filing'

This type of filing is used when all the details of a new issue are not known. Parties involved in the offering try to ensure that the filings are in place and most of the details correct, reducing the future time spent on paperwork after all the details are ironed out.

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