Quiet Period

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DEFINITION of 'Quiet Period'

In terms of an IPO, the period where an issuer is subject to a SEC ban on promotional publicity. The quiet period usually lasts either 40 or 90 days from the IPO.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Quiet Period'

In other words, If you take your company public, you can't talk about your stock to anybody for 3 months.

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