Quoted Price

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DEFINITION of 'Quoted Price'

The most recent price at which an investment (or any other type of asset) has traded. The quoted price of investments such as stocks, bonds, commodities and derivatives changes constantly throughout the day as events occur that affect the financial markets and the perceived value of various investments. The quoted price represents the most recent bid and ask prices that buyers and sellers were able to agree on.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Quoted Price'

The quoted prices of stocks are displayed on an electronic ticker tape, which shows up-to-the-minute information on trading price and trading volume throughout the trading day. The tape shows the stock (indicated by a three- or four-letter stock symbol), the number of shares traded, the price they traded at (in decimal form), whether the quoted price represents an increase or decrease from the last quoted price and the amount of the change in price.



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