Quote Driven Market

What is a 'Quote Driven Market'

A quote driven market is an electronic stock exchange system in which prices are determined from bid and ask quotations made by market makers, dealers or specialists. In a quote driven market, also known as a price driven market, dealers fill orders from their own inventory or by matching them with other orders. A quote driven market is the opposite of an order driven market, which displays individual investors' bid and ask prices and the number of shares they want to trade.

BREAKING DOWN 'Quote Driven Market'

Order execution is not guaranteed in an order driven market, but it is guaranteed in a quote driven market because market makers are required to meet the bid and ask prices they quote. A quote driven market is more liquid but lacks transparency. A hybrid market combines the features of both quote driven and order driven markets. The NYSE and Nasdaq are both considered hybrid markets.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the difference between a quote driven market and an order driven one?

    The difference between these two market systems lies in what is displayed in the market in terms of orders and bid and ask ... Read Answer >>
  2. What's the difference between a Nasdaq market maker and a NYSE specialist?

    What's the main difference between a specialist and a market maker? Not much. Both the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) specialist ... Read Answer >>
  3. Is it actually possible that my trades consistently get executed higher than the ...

    Can one of the best brokerage names fail to execute trades on market orders consistently at higher (buy o... Read Answer >>
  4. What do the bid and ask prices represent on a stock quote?

    Learn what the bid and ask prices mean in a stock quote. Find out what represents supply and demand in the stock market and ... Read Answer >>
  5. What exactly is being done when shares are bought and sold?

    Most stocks are traded on physical or virtual exchanges. The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), for example, is a physical exchange ... Read Answer >>
  6. Why are the bid prices of T-bills higher than the ask prices? Aren't bids supposed ...

    Yes, you are correct that the ask price of a security should typically be higher than the bid price. This is because people ... Read Answer >>
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