R-Squared

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DEFINITION of 'R-Squared'

A statistical measure that represents the percentage of a fund or security's movements that can be explained by movements in a benchmark index. For fixed-income securities, the benchmark is the T-bill. For equities, the benchmark is the S&P 500.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'R-Squared'

R-squared values range from 0 to 100. An R-squared of 100 means that all movements of a security are completely explained by movements in the index. A high R-squared (between 85 and 100) indicates the fund's performance patterns have been in line with the index. A fund with a low R-squared (70 or less) doesn't act much like the index.

A higher R-squared value will indicate a more useful beta figure. For example, if a fund has an R-squared value of close to 100 but has a beta below 1, it is most likely offering higher risk-adjusted returns. A low R-squared means you should ignore the beta.

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    Some mutual fund companies report the R-squared of established funds in advertising literature, while others do not. Yahoo! ... Read Full Answer >>
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  4. What's the difference between r-squared and correlation?

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