Rain Check

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DEFINITION of 'Rain Check'

A promise or commitment by a seller to a buyer that an item currently out of stock can be purchased at a later date for today's sale price.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Rain Check'

The term originated from baseball; spectators at games that were postponed because of rain would receive a check that could be used to attend a future game.

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