Razor-Razorblade Model

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DEFINITION of 'Razor-Razorblade Model'

A business tactic involving the sale of dependent goods for different prices - one good is sold at a discount, while the second dependent good is sold at a considerably higher price.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Razor-Razorblade Model'

If you've ever purchased razors and their replacement blades, you know this business method well. The razors are practically free, but the replacement blades are extremely expensive.

The video game industry is another user of this pricing strategy. They sell the game consoles at a relatively low price, recouping the lost profits on the high-priced games.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the Razor/Razorblade model?

    The Razor/Razorblade business model owes its name to one King Gillette, founder of the eponymous razorblade company. The ... Read Full Answer >>
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