Real Estate Owned - REO


DEFINITION of 'Real Estate Owned - REO'

Property owned by a lender - usually a bank - after an unsuccessful sale at a foreclosure auction. This is common because most of the properties up for sale at these auctions are worth less than the total amount owed to the bank: the minimum bid in most foreclosure auctions equal the outstanding loan amount, the accrued interest and any fees associated with the foreclosure sale.

BREAKING DOWN 'Real Estate Owned - REO'

If the property is real estate owned, the bank will then go through the process of trying to sell the property on its own. It will try to remove some of the liens and other expenses on the home, and then try to sell it on the market. Real estate investors will often go after these properties as banks are not in the business of owning homes and, in some cases, the house can be bought at a discount to its market value.

  1. Real Estate Investment Trust - ...

    A REIT is a type of security that invests in real estate through ...
  2. Real Estate

    Land plus anything on it, including buildings and natural resources.
  3. Foreclosure - FCL

    A situation in which a homeowner is unable to make principal ...
  4. Mortgage

    A debt instrument, secured by the collateral of specified real ...
  5. Shadow Inventory

    A term that refers to real estate properties that are either ...
  6. Propco

    An abbreviation for property company. Propcos are most often ...
Related Articles
  1. Budgeting

    Mortgages: How Much Can You Afford?

    Answering this means number-crunching as well as factoring in other considerations and expenses.
  2. Home & Auto

    The Pitfalls Of Buying A Foreclosure House

    Find out if the house you're eyeing is really a good deal.
  3. Home & Auto

    How To Analyze Real Estate Investment Trusts

    REITs are much like dividend-paying companies, but analyzing them requires consideration of the accounting treatment of property.
  4. Credit & Loans

    Understanding The Mortgage Payment Structure

    We explain the calculation and payment process as well as the amortization schedule of home loans.
  5. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Top 3 Commodities Mutual Funds

    Get information about some of the most popular and best-performing mutual funds that are focused on commodity-related investments.
  6. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Top 4 Asia-Pacific ETFs

    Learn about four of the best-performing exchange-traded funds, or ETFs, that offer investors exposure to the Asia-Pacific region.
  7. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Top 4 Global Real Estate Mutual Funds

    Read about four of the best global real estate mutual funds, which invest in the securities of real estate companies or real estate investment trusts (REITs).
  8. Insurance

    What is a Force Majeure?

    A force majeure clause frees both parties in a contract from fulfilling their obligations in the event of some catastrophic or unexpected occurrence.
  9. Credit & Loans

    Explaining Equated Monthly Installments

    An equated monthly installment is a fixed payment a borrower makes to a lender on the same date of each month.
  10. Stock Analysis

    The 5 Best Alternatives to Zillow & Trulia

    Understand the online real estate industry and how Zillow and Trulia are industry leaders. Learn about alternatives to Zillow and Trulia.
  1. Where do penny stocks trade?

    Generally, penny stocks are traded through the use of the Over the Counter Bulletin Board (OTCBB) and through pink sheets. ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Where can I buy penny stocks?

    Some penny stocks, those using the definition of trading for less than $5 per share, are traded on regular exchanges such ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How are American Depository Receipts (ADRs) priced?

    The price of an American depositary receipt (ADR) is determined by the bank or other financial institution that issues it. ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How are American Depository Receipts (ADRs) exchanged?

    American depositary receipts (ADRs) are bought and sold on regular U.S. stock exchanges, either in the over-the-counter market ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between adjusted and regular funds from operations?

    While regular funds from operations measures the cash flow generated by the operations of a real estate investment trust ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are examples of typical leasehold improvements?

    Typical leasehold improvements include partitioning a large, open space into smaller, more structured areas such as dressing ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Zero-Sum Game

    A situation in which one person’s gain is equivalent to another’s loss, so that the net change in wealth or benefit is zero. ...
  2. Capitalization Rate

    The rate of return on a real estate investment property based on the income that the property is expected to generate.
  3. Gross Profit

    A company's total revenue (equivalent to total sales) minus the cost of goods sold. Gross profit is the profit a company ...
  4. Revenue

    The amount of money that a company actually receives during a specific period, including discounts and deductions for returned ...
  5. Normal Profit

    An economic condition occurring when the difference between a firm’s total revenue and total cost is equal to zero.
  6. Operating Cost

    Expenses associated with the maintenance and administration of a business on a day-to-day basis.
Trading Center
You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!