Realized Yield

Definition of 'Realized Yield'


The actual amount of return earned on a security investment over a period of time. This period of time is typically the holding period which may differ from the expected yield at maturity. The realized yield also includes the returns that have been earned from reinvested interest, dividends and other cash distributions.

Investopedia explains 'Realized Yield'


The realized yield tends to differ from the yield at maturity in scenarios where the holding period is less than that of the maturity date. In other words, the security is settled or sold prior to the maturity date given at the time of purchase.

For example, suppose an investor purchases a 10-year bond for $1,000 that issues a 5% annual coupon. Furthermore, if the investor sells the bond for $1,000 at the end of the first year (and after receiving the first coupon payment), her realized yield would only include the $50 coupon payment.


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